Do We Expect The Miraculous To Happen?

When you gather with other Christians, do you expect miraculous things to happen? I mean, genuine, bonified, no doubt about it, miracles? I don’t. I expect three things to happen:

  • Sing
  • Sermon / small group discussion / something else
  • Snack(s)

The end.

But in Galatians 3:5 Paul says:

Does he who supplies the Spirit to you and works miracles among you do so by works of the law, or by hearing with faith—just as Abraham “believed God, and it was counted to him as righteousness”?

Paul expected that when the Galatians gathered for worship, the Spirit would work miracles among them. What sort of miracles? He doesn’t say, but I can imagine that he had all sorts of things in mind, like miracles of healing, specific prophetic words, prayers of encouragement, someone being born again, and a whole lot of other things. Paul just assumed that those things were happening. Miracles. All the time. Because the Spirit was in the their midst.

Let’s raise our expectations for what happens when we gather to sing, pray, hear the word, and encourage one another.

Yeah?

Comments

  1. rockstarkp says

    How do you guard against "false expectations" then?
    How do you have proper miraculous expectations without falling into the "name it and claim it" camp?

    • Joan says

      Thank you for asking this question. I wrestle with this as well. Where and how do you draw this line? I've been in groups where the expectation seems more like a demand. God you said you are about the charismatic gifts so go ahead now, here we are, let's do this thing. Seems that is THE main emphasis for the church. I'm now in a church that teaches that miracles are needed in young churches or with young Christians to encourage faith but as you move on not so much. These churches tend to move completely out of the experiential, move onto doctrine, creeds etc. Why can't the two camps ever merge? Surely there are new Christians coming into the latter and surely all Christians need to mature into doctrine and creeds emphasized in the former. Seems both sides fear the extremes of the other and stay entrenched and immovable.

  2. says

    Yes, I'm with you. We go with an expectant, prayerful heart of faith while guarding our hearts from demanding God work in specific ways. It's a fine line, one that requires maturity, I believe, to balance and a sensitive, wise pastor to shepherd the flock through…We go with open hands and gratefully accept what God gives us….it will always be better than we deserve. That we can bank on!

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